Campers lying on a rock and pointing to the sky.

Dear Treetops Families,

Sure signs of spring are finally here! After a late-season snowstorm in April (the biggest we had all year), the snow has finally all melted or been washed away by rain showers. The grass, grateful to be unburdened of the blanket of slush, turns greener by the day. A little bunch of purple crocuses are in bloom by the main entrance and the daylilies, daffodils, and tulips are beginning to stretch their green leaves to the sky.

Another true sign of the change in season is that North Country School and our farmers recently wrapped up sugaring, one of my favorite times of year. Whether drilling holes in the trees and hammering in spiles, collecting and lugging full sap buckets, or helping with the many and varied tasks at an evening sap boil in the Sugar House, I always feel like I’ve been let in on a special secret, one only known to those in the North Country where the sugar maples reign supreme during that magical season between winter and spring in which the nights still freeze, but the days are warm with sunshine. 

I feel heartened and privileged to know that I’m able to take part in a tradition discovered and practiced by the Indigenous people of this area who, as the story goes, later taught the method to the new settlers. Lore of how the slightly sweet maple sap was discovered range from Indigenous peoples observing red squirrels nibbling maple branches and greedily lapping up the dripping sap, to an errant toss of a tomahawk by a member of the Iroquois nation who then took advantage of the resulting flow of the maple nectar—and surely these are just two of many more origin stories. What strikes me about these stories is a quality still reflected in the people of the North Country today—of seeing the myriad opportunities presented to us by nature, and running with them. 

At Treetops, we dig into this tradition and celebrate the daily opportunities that nature provides us. With our founders’ intentional and brilliant design of our program, our days have a built in flexibility for our activities, in that we are able to incorporate spontaneity and whimsy into nearly every moment. Our campus offers up a smorgasbord of ideas, opportunities, and activities, many of which organically arise from the natural world around us. From rainstorms that provide an opportunity to splash in mud puddles and tour campus on a “Mud Walk” and beautiful sunsets over Round Lake that gives us a chance to practice painting with watercolors, to the plentiful currant bushes that we use to create delicious jam for scones and more in the Teaching & Learning Kitchen.

In a world in which so much is planned—not only are the hours in our day mapped out, but so too are the months, and even years ahead of us—a summer at Treetops is filled with simple, yet luxurious moments for our campers. Whether harvesting carrots in the early morning before breakfast, reveling in the one they brushed off on their shirt and made a snack of, to their counselor taking them out of bed on a clear night to watch the sky for shooting stars and point out constellations, at Camp, our children can dig in to the moment. 

At Treetops, we recognize the incredible gifts nature presents us each and every day, and much like the labors of sugaring season, we know it is fleeting and take advantage of every drop.

I’m so looking forward to sharing this beautiful campus with our Treetops campers in June!

Best,

Hannah Edwards
Camp Treetops Director

We can't wait to see you!
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